Why Some Fizzle, While Others Go Viral

Sue BerginSue Bergin, President, S Bergin Communications

Have you ever wondered why a silly email gets passed around the office, yet you can’t get a client to forward an interesting article you wrote to a colleague? Does it frustrate you that sports fails get millions of views, yet you’ve only had two people view your LinkedIn profile in the last 20 days? Ever wonder why your tweets don’t get favored, shared or retweeted?

The New Yorker’s recent article, “The Six Things That Make Stories Go Viral Will Amaze, and Maybe Infuriate You,” takes a stab at solving these mysteries.

The article, which cites studies conducted by two Wharton professors, reveals the common characteristics of widely shared stories. These stories or messages typically evoke an emotion from the reader, with happy pieces faring better than sad. They also create a social currency and make the viewer feel “in the know.”

Shareable stories also typically have memory-inducing triggers. They are easy to pass along because they can be found and retrieved.

Gone ViralThe final predictor of whether a story will go viral is the quality of the content itself. The Holderness family rivaled Santa himself in spreading holiday greetings because their “Christmas Jammies” YouTube video was so well done. Otherwise, over 13 million people would not have invested the 218 seconds to watch.

So before you make your next LinkedIn post or tweet something on Twitter, make sure the content you are providing is relatable to your followers and will elicit a response. Then you can begin the journey of becoming a social media influencer and setting yourself a part from the crowd.

Social Media Strategies: Yield to Client Preferences

Sue Bergin@SueBergin

Every investor has his or her unique communication and learning style.  Some prefer face-to-face meetings, while a quick text message will suffice for others.  Some investors are highly analytical and need to understand the data behind their investment philosophy while others take a “just give me the bottom line” approach.

Most successful advisors have become adept at assessing the communication and learning styles of their clients and adapting accordingly.  When it comes to a social media strategy, advisors should use a similar approach.

10.15.13_Men are From LinkedInAccording to the recent survey[1] sponsored by MassMutual and conducted by Brightwork Partners, “women are from Facebook, men are from LinkedIn,” various demographic groups are congregating around their social media channel of choice.  Consider these stats:

  • 70% of women routinely use Facebook vs. 59% of men
  • 57% of survey respondents over the age of 50 use Facebook
  • 32% of men use LinkedIn, compared to 15% of women
  • 17% of men versus 10% of women rely on Twitter as an information source
  • 36% of LinkedIn users have household incomes that exceed $100,000
  • 15% of LinkedIn users have household incomes of $50,000 or less
  • Survey respondents in their 30s are 14% more likely to use social media for retirement and investment education than their older counterparts
  • 80% of Pinterest’s 70 million users are women[2]

MassMutual’s study is the latest in a line of research that demonstrates the role social media can play in educating clients.  From a tactical perspective, it is helpful to note that a Tweet, Facebook post, LinkedIn message or Pinterest post will reach only the audience following that channel.

From a practical standpoint, you may want to synchronize your social media messages.  So, for example, if you sync your Twitter and LinkedIn files, LinkedIn contacts will see your Twitter updates and vice versa.  Keep in mind that some content is more appropriate for certain channels over others.  For example, tweets can only accommodate 140 characters but Facebook posts may be more extensive. Pinterest is most appropriate for visual content, like the inspiring image below originally pinned by ForexRin.

10.15.13_Men are From LinkedIn_1In the end, social media is about listening and engaging with your clients.  Services like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and GoGoStat can help monitor and track your social media engagement so that you will know which channels are most valuable to your practice.

Mapping Your Social Network by Matt Oechsli @MattOeschsli

by: Matt Oechsli

If you’re serious about targeting today’s affluent investor, it’s time to get social. We’ve become addicted to our digital toys (iPads, BlackBerrys, etc.), and social media is elbowing onto center stage. Our research tells us today’s affluent want to know their advisor on a social level in addition to their professional role.

Because the human species is such a social animal, you wouldn’t think this would be an issue for advisors. Yet many advisors are behind the curve when it comes to socializing with affluent clients, referral alliance partners, and prospects. Our research shows that investors clearly are more likely to introduce someone they know to their advisor if the investors have both a business and personal relationship with the advisor, as opposed to a relationship that was exclusively business.

Our research also shows that elite advisors intuitively recognize the importance of social media technology, and they’re early adopters. It’s the essence of both relationship management and relationship marketing. Today’s reality is that advisors who have both a business and a personal relationship with their affluent clients have more centers-of-influence penetration.

This data reinforces what we’ve learned from our rainmaker research—social prospecting in affluent circles today is what cold calling was some 25 years ago; it’s what public seminars were about some 15 years ago. And yet, at a recent workshop we sponsored on best practices of elite advisors, it was obvious that socializing in affluent circles made some advisors uncomfortable. Among the questions: “When do you talk about business? What social activities should you engage in?Do you mean that we’re supposed to mix business with pleasure?”

Socializing is directly linked to word-of-mouth-influence (WOMI), and advisors need to understand the importance of WOMI in affluent decision-making. It’s the high-octane fuel that activates the process; relationship management (affluent clients) and relationship marketing (penetrating affluent COIs) are inextricably linked in stimulating positive WOMI. This is a gift. Why? Because advisors can now schmooze with their top clients, meet their friends in a non-threatening environment, develop rapport, build personal relationships, and transition their clients’ friends into new clients. Knowing “who knows whom” is what mapping your affluent client’s social networks is all about.

Social network analysis

A quick glimpse into the budding field of social network analysis highlights the innate power of WOMI. Social network analysis, the study of social relationships between individuals and groups, goes back to the ancient Greeks. Modern theories arrived in the early 1900s, and today scientists study its implications in everything from relationships within high schools to the spread of disease.

We find this fascinating. Think about your web of contacts for a moment and ask yourself four questions:

1) If you were to chart your relationships with your top 25 clients, how many have both a business and personal relationship?

2) If you were to chart your social contacts, how many total connections could you list? How many have the means to conduct business with you?

3) If you were to chart your referral alliance partner relationships, how many connections could you list?

4) What type of branding is being broadcast through your social network?

Connected, a book by Drs. Nicholas Christakis and James Fowler, shares an example of how social networks play a role in marketing. They tell a story of two piano teachers in Arizona who grew their respective business only through WOMI; they never advertised or promoted their services. At the end of the year, they analyzed their clientele and discovered that 38 percent of their new business came by WOMI from people that hadn’t personally used their services. Their reputation was communicated through friends of friends of their clients—three degrees of separation.

Whether you have 25 or 125 affluent clients, imagine the power of WOMI within your business. Essentially, social prospecting is simply socializing with your affluent clients and prospects in venues that you enjoy, but with strategic intent. The idea is not to discuss business. However, whenever a business conversation surfaces, the social prospecting drill is as follows: listen; if asked, answer questions briefly; gently table that topic for another time; exchange cell phone numbers; set a time and place to discuss business; and continue socializing.

Elite advisors have turned mapping their affluent clients’ social network into an art form. If you allow yourself to get social, you can, too.