A Mixed Start to 2014

Ryan Dressel Ryan Dressel, Investment Analyst, Brinker Capital

With 2013 in the rear view mirror, investors are looking for signs that the U.S. economy has enough steam to keep up the impressive growth pace for equities set last year.  This means maintaining sustainable growth in 2014 with less assistance from the Federal Reserve in the form of its asset purchasing program, quantitative easing.  Based on economic data and corporate earnings released so far in January, investors have had a difficult time reaching a conclusion on where we stand.

To date, 101 of the S&P 500 Index companies have reported fourth quarter 2013 earnings (as of this writing).  71% have exceeded consensus earnings per share (EPS) estimates, yielding an aggregate growth rate 5.83% above analyst estimates (Bloomberg).  The four-year average is 73% according to FactSet, indicating that Wall Street’s expectations are still low compared to actual corporate performance.  Information technology and healthcare have been big reasons why, with 85% and 89% of companies beating fourth quarter EPS estimates respectively.

Despite these positive numbers, two industries that are failing to meet analyst estimates are consumer discretionary and materials.  Both of these sectors tend to outperform the broad market during the recovery stage of a business cycle, which we currently find ourselves in.  If they begin to underperform or are in line with the market, then it could indicate the beginning of a potential short-term market top.

S&P500 Index - Earnings Growth vs. Predicted

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There has been mixed data on the macro front as well:

Positive Data

  • Annualized U.S. December housing starts were stronger than expected (999,000 vs. Bloomberg analyst consensus 985,000).
  • U.S. Industrial production rose 0.3% in December, marking five consecutive monthly increases.[1]
  • U.S. December jobless claims fell 3.9% to 335,000; the lowest total in five weeks.
  • The HSBC Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) was above 50 for most of the developed and emerging markets.  An index reading above 50 indicates expansion from a production standpoint.  This data supports a broad-based global economic recovery.

Negative Data:

  • The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan index of U.S. consumer confidence unexpectedly fell to 80.4 from 82.5 in December.
  • The average hourly wages of private sector U.S. works (adjusted for inflation) fell -0.03% compared to a 0.3% increase in CPI for December, 2013.  Wages have risen just 0.02% over the last 12 months indicating that American workers have not been benefiting from low inflation.
  • Preliminary Chinese PMI fell to 49.6 in January, compared to 50.5 in December and the lowest since July 2013.
S&P Performance Jan 2014

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The mixed corporate and economic data released in January has led to a sideways trend for the S&P 500 so far in 2014.  We remain optimistic for the year ahead, but are managing our portfolios with an eye on the inherent risks previously mentioned.


[1]  The statistics in this release cover output, capacity, and capacity utilization in the U.S. industrial sector, which is defined by the Federal Reserve to comprise manufacturing, mining, and electric and gas utilities. Mining is defined as all industries in sector 21 of the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS); electric and gas utilities are those in NAICS sectors 2211 and 2212. Manufacturing comprises NAICS manufacturing industries (sector 31-33) plus the logging industry and the newspaper, periodical, book, and directory publishing industries. Logging and publishing are classified elsewhere in NAICS (under agriculture and information respectively), but historically they were considered to be manufacturing and were included in the industrial sector under the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. In December 2002 the Federal Reserve reclassified all its industrial output data from the SIC system to NAICS.

Investment Insights Podcast – December 24, 2013

Investment Insights PodcastBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

Last week, the Federal Reserve announced their new policy on tapering.  ISI Group calculates that if the Fed continues on this new track, they would buy $455 billion more of bonds in 2014 before the taper finishes.

  • Good news: New policy, gradual taper, means interest rates weren’t forced to spike
  • Bad news: Not likely of staying on track. Stronger employment data and economic growth early in 2014 would make the Fed taper at faster rate, driving interest rates up.
  • What we are doing about it: Product-specific, but tactics would include researching managers who perform well in a rising interest rate environment or utilizing inverse ETFs

Click the play icon below to launch the audio recording.

The views expressed above are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice.

Labor Market: Myths vs. Reality

Neil-DuttaThe following excerpt has been provided by Mr. Neil Dutta, Head of Economics at Renaissance Macro Research.

Myth #1: America is a nation of part-timers
Here is what is true: Over the last four months, part-time employment has expanded by 8.9% at an annual rate while full-time employment has risen at just a 0.5% annual rate. What is not true is that rising part-time work represents a new structural phenomenon in the U.S. labor market.

8.20.13_Dutta_RenMac_LaborMarketConsider the following points: part-time employment represents one-fifth of total household employment. A quick inspection of this series screams cyclical NOT structural. That is, the series rises during recessions and falls as the recovery gains traction. The Household Survey is notoriously volatile, so it makes sense to analyze longer-term trends. Over the last year, all of the increase in part-time employment has been for non-economic reasons (child care, vacation, schooling, training, etc.)

Why has this subject generated so much attention? Simple. The Affordable Care Act (ACA). However, there is little survey evidence that firms plan to materially alter worker hours because of the health law. A survey of firms across the New York Fed District found that only 12% of respondents refrained from hiring or shifted full-time workers into part-time; that compares to 7% that made minimal changes to their workforce. So, the ACA is having marginal impact, but it is overwhelmed by business cycle dynamics.

Myth #2: Job gains are all low wage
Earlier this month USA Today ran with the following headline, “Many new jobs are part-time and low-paying”. This is a true statement. Many of the jobs being created are low-paying and that may or may not be something to worry about. What is not true, however, is that this is a new development and unique only to this recovery.

8.20.13_Dutta_RenMac_LaborMarket_2The two sectors that get the most attention are retail trade and leisure & hospitality. So, we went back five economic cycles and looked at the composition of employment growth from the payroll trough to peak. Here is what we found: retail trade and leisure & hospitality employment, typically accounts for one-fourth of the job creation. In this cycle, 28.2% of the new jobs are in these categories. That compares to 28.4% in the 2003-07 recover, 23.4% in the 90s, 28.5% in the 80s, and 23.7% in the 70s.

More broadly, the narrative misses the fact the wages typically lag in employment recoveries. While the labor market continues to recover in a relative sense, there is still plenty of slack. What is important is that these unemployed workers here value. Otherwise, they would not be able to exert downward pressure on the wages of those working and the newly employed. That tells us the labor stack is cyclical not structural. As the labor recovery ensues and the slack is absorbed, wages will begin to rise. When growth bears fret about low-wage work, a more apt translation at this stage is: it is still early in the jobs recovery.

8.20.13_Dutta_RenMac_LaborMarket_3

The views expressed above are those of Neil Dutta and are not intended as investment advice.

Solid Employment Report, but More Improvement Needed

Amy Magnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

Friday’s employment report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics was encouraging.  We added 171,000 payrolls in October, and previous months were revised upward by +84,000.  A majority of private industries added jobs during the month.  The unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9% as more people entered the workforce than could find jobs.

This report is consistent with sluggish growth and should not warrant any change in monetary policy.  The Fed is looking for a “substantial improvement” in the labor market, which includes an increase in labor force participation.  The labor force participation rate, which had been declining precipitously since mid-2008, moved up to 63.8% after hitting a record low 63.5% in August.  Consumer perceptions surrounding the economy have improved, which will draw more people back into the labor force.  However, the economy is not growing fast enough to absorb all of the new entrants.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

There remains considerable slack in the labor market, and as a result, wage growth has been dismal.  Friday’s report continued on that trend, with average hourly earnings growth falling to just 1.1% year over year.  With inflation running at 2.0% year over year, wages are contracting in real terms.  Weak wage growth will keep a lid on inflation.

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

With payroll growth averaging 170,000 over the last three months, and the employment rate now below 8%, there are positive signs in the labor market.  However, we still have a long way to go.  Economic growth at 2% is not strong enough to bring down the unemployment rate substantially.  The slack in the labor market will continue to place downward pressure on wages, which will impact consumer spending.  The Fed has committed to remain accommodative until they see more progress.  Help from the fiscal and regulatory side – in addressing the fiscal cliff and then putting into place a longer-term fiscal plan – would be a big positive, providing companies with some certainty and the confidence they need to increase hiring plans.