Investment Insights Podcast – April 9, 2014

Bill MillerBill Miller, Chief Investment Officer

On this week’s podcast (recorded April 8, 2014):

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  • What we like: When companies buy shares, decreasing supply of stock in the market; Underlying fundamentals in economy are strong

Pages from JDT_APR2014-4

  • What we don’t like: When companies do too many initial public offerings, the supply in the marketplace dilutes the buying power of demand in the short-term setting the stage for a correction; IPO calendar is heavy

Pages from JDT_APR2014-3

  • What we are doing about it: Watching the IPO calendar carefully; intersection of the seasonal factors–slower summer months; Looking for a strong third and fourth quarter market

Pages from JDT_APR2014-2

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Charts Source: Strategas Research Partners, Investment Strategy Outlook, April 2014

The views expressed are those of Brinker Capital and are for informational purposes only. Holdings are subject to change.

Sentiment

Jeff RauppJeff Raupp, CFA, Senior Investment Manager

In February 1637, tulip bulbs sold in Holland for as much as 4,000 guilders each, over 10x the amount a skilled craftsman would earn in a year.  Months later, many tulip traders found themselves holding bulbs worth just a fraction of what they had paid for.

As crazy as prices got, tulip mania actually started with good fundamentals. Tulips were a relatively new introduction to Europe, and the flower’s intense color made it a heavily-desired feature of upper-class gardens. Most desirable were the exotic-looking, multi-colored tulips, which was caused by a mosaic virus not identified until the 1970s and now called the “tulip-breaking virus.” At best, tulip bulbs weren’t easy to produce and those with the virus suffered even lower reproduction rates. In the beginning, what occurred in the tulip market was classic supply and demand—a highly sought-after item with limited supply increasing in price. In 1634, that started to change as 11.1.13_Raupp_Sentimentspeculators were attracted to the rising prices, and in late 1636 prices started to accelerate rapidly, to where even single-color tulips were attracting prices of over 100 guilders apiece. The Dutch created a futures market for tulips that enabled traders to purchase and trade contracts to buy bulbs at the end of the season. At the peak, tulips could be traded several times a day without any physical tulips actually being exchanged or either party ever having any intention of planting the bulbs.

Then in February 1637, buyers vanished. Some suspect an outbreak of the bubonic plague as the cause, some a change in demand caused by war in Europe. Any way you look at it, the sentiment for the future price of tulip bulbs took a big U-turn, leaving many investors ruined.[1]

11.1.13_Raupp_Sentiment_1History is full of similar episodes, where investor sentiment got to extreme levels and prices diverged meaningfully from the underlying fundamental value of something, be it stocks, real estate, currency, or even tulip bulbs. Most recently the dot-com bubble in the early 2000s and the housing bubble in 2008 proved that speculation is alive and well.

While periods of extreme sentiment are easy to identify in retrospect, they’re anything but obvious while you’re in them. And while extreme levels of sentiment usually result in big price reversals, more modest levels can mark periods when the market is overbought or oversold, often followed by a market pull-back or rally. Recently, Robert Shiller of Yale University won the Nobel Prize in Economics for his work on irrational markets.

11.1.13_Raupp_Sentiment_2So how can you gauge sentiment? Some of the more popular ones are the Consumer Confidence Index and the Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index, which both try to gauge consumer’s attitudes on a variety of things, including future spending, the business climate, and their level of optimism or pessimism. More direct, and generally more volatile, are the AAII Investor Sentiment Survey and the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index, which ask investors directly about their thoughts on investments. It doesn’t end there. Investors watch Closed-End Fund discounts, Put/Call ratios, even tracking the occurrence of certain words or phrases in the media. In addition, many firms create their own blend of surveys and indexes to best gauge the overall sentiment level.

Sentiment certainly isn’t the be-all, end-all for trading your portfolio. There’s a saying that is attributed to John Maynard Keynes, “The market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent.” When sentiment starts moving in one direction, it’s hard to say when the reversal will occur and what will cause it. But knowing where sentiment levels are at any given time can help you get a better understanding of what markets have been doing and what to expect going forward.


[1] Mackay, Charles (1841), Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds, London: Richard Bentley, archived from the original on March 31, 2008.

Housing Market a Reason for Optimism

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

After detracting from economic growth for a number of years, the U.S. housing market is in a position to be a positive contributor to growth.  The supply and demand dynamics in the housing market are attractive.

Supply is at low levels.  According to the National Association of Realtors, the supply of available homes is currently 4.2 months, down from over 12 months at the worst of the market.  New housing starts have improved, but are still at levels last seen in the early 1990s.  There are also fewer foreclosed properties on the market. CoreLogic reported that 1.2 million properties were in some stage of foreclosure in January, a 21% year-over-year decrease.  Finally, investors (both individual and institutional) have been snapping up properties in previously distressed markets.

Source: FactSet, National Association of Realtors

Source: FactSet, National Association of Realtors

Some owners are waiting for higher prices to put their homes on the market.  However, prices are firming by a number of measures.  The S&P/Case-Shiller National Home Price Index gained +7.3% in 2012.  CoreLogic’s Home Price Index gained +9.7% year over year in January, the eleventh consecutive monthly increase.
Tighter levels of inventory have likely led to higher prices in recent months.  However, rising prices will eventually encourage homeowners to sell and builders to build, adding to inventory and thereby slowing the rise in prices.

Source: FactSet, U.S. Census Bureau

Source: FactSet, U.S. Census Bureau

The demand side of the equation is also positive.  There is pent-up demand for new housing that has built up over the last few years as households have been formed.  Additional job growth will create more demand.  Affordability is still at very high levels with interest rates at record low levels.  If interest rates start to move higher, it could be a trigger for fence sitters to move. Guidelines are strict for obtaining a loan (I can attest to this with my personal experience over the last month), but credit is being extended.

The constructive dynamics in the housing market should be a positive for the economy over the intermediate term.  There are additional benefits to the economy that stem from an improvement in housing – consumers spend on appliances, home improvement (I’ve visited Home Depot or Lowes every other day in the last few weeks), contractors, architects, etc.  In addition, stable and rising home prices will also serve as a boost to consumer net worth and confidence.