Understanding Behavioral Style in Developing New Business – Part 1 by Bev Flaxington

Have you ever been taken completely by surprise by a client or prospect? Or have you ever been unable to close a sale because you just couldn’t “get through” to them? Today, investors are being bombarded by so many advisors and business development people – all trying to connect and persuade them to become clients. However, one of the most fundamental ways to connect with prospects is often overlooked by those in a selling role: understanding behavioral styles and adapting one’s communication approach to the people s/he’s trying to persuade.

You may have at one time taken a training course on relationship-building, face-to-face selling skills, or something similar, but the key to understanding the buyer’s perspective necessarily begins with an understanding of behavioral style. This is because behavioral style is the crux of understanding communication style – and true communication is the key to developing great relationships in both your personal and professional life.
So, is it really true that your likelihood of signing new clients could come down to your behavioral style? Research conducted in 1984 and validated again every year since has proven three things: 1) people buy from people with similar behavioral styles to their own, 2) people in a selling type of role tend to gravitate towards people with behavioral styles similar to their own, and 3) if people in a selling or business development type role adapt their behavioral style to that of the prospect, sales increase.

Many advisors, business development and client service personnel have excellent communication skills, but have difficulty in relationships with prospects and clients – and don’t understand why. Something just doesn’t feel right, but they’re not sure how to diagnose the problem or modify their behavior for greater success. Often times, it’s not technique (i.e. the questions asked, presentation or negotiating skills, etc.) but rather a lack of understanding of one’s own behavioral style and motivators, and of knowing that behavioral differences can cause significant communication difficulties that hamstring closing a prospect or an ongoing relationship with clients.
One scientific way to understand behavioral style is through an assessment called DISC (Dominance, Influencing, Steadiness, Compliance). Based upon the work of Carl Jung, the DISC approach was invented by William Moulton Marston, inventor of the lie detector and holder of a Harvard MBA, over 80 years ago. The statistically based profiles show a person’s preferred styles on four scales of behavior – Problems, People, Pace and Procedures:

• Dominance (“D” factor) How one handles problems and challenges
• Influence (“I” factor) How one handles people and influences others
• Steadiness (“S” factor) How one handles work environment, change and pace
• Compliance (“C” factor) How one handles rules and procedures set by others

Depending on our differences in style and approach, we can either get along very easily together (because we’re so much alike!) or we can have significant clashes in our relationship.

A person’s behavioral preferences have everything to do with their communication approach and style. People who operate with very different styles have a difficult time “hearing” one another and communicating effectively. For instance, if I communicate only within my own behavioral comfort zone, I will only be effective with people who are just like me. However, in the corporate environment we are dealing every day with colleagues, prospects, clients and management – all of whom can be very different behaviorally. Not only is communication difficult where there are differences, but often individuals become hostile and conflict-oriented toward one another. Significant time, effort and corporate money is wasted because people are unable to “get along” and work together effectively toward common corporate goals. (Refer to the Brinker blog “Dealing with Difficult Clients” for a complementary discussion of this topic.)

In the next blog, we’ll take a “deeper dive” into behavior style – how you can identify it in your prospects and use this knowledge to improve your selling effectiveness.

Your Parents’ and Children’s Annoying Communication Habits Can Help Improve Client Relationships by Sue Bergin

Do you have someone in your life that has a cell phone, but refuses to turn it on? For me, it’s my parents. It doesn’t matter if my 76-year-old father is riding his Harley Davidson through the Blue Ridge Mountains and no one has heard from him in three days. We just have to sit tight until he gets sick of camping and checks into a hotel. Then, he’ll call us. We can tell him to keep his phone on until we are blue in the face. We can buy him an unlimited calling plan for his next birthday. It isn’t going to make a difference. The phone is for emergencies only. As long as he is ok, it stays off.

Have you ever threatened to take away your daughter’s cell phone because they won’t pick up your calls? You don’t understand why she doesn’t take your calls when she knows it’s you, and she knows you want to reach her. She doesn’t understand why you have to talk to her when you can just send a text. She probably doesn’t want her friends to know she must actually talk to her parents. She definitely doesn’t want her friends to hear how she talks to her parents. She would much rather you text her. That way she can whine in private. On the contrary, you’d prefer to hear her voice so that you can better gauge the situation.

With varying degrees of aggravation, we have learned to conform to communication preferences in our personal relationships.

When it comes to your relationships with clients, however, you want to avoid communication frustration. Recognize that clients have their pet tools, and demonstrate a willingness to communicate with them according to their preferences, not yours.

Ask clients how they want their appointments confirmed. Do they want a text, e-mail or a phone call? Would they rather your newsletters and routine correspondence come in the mail to their home or office, or would they rather have them e-mailed. Would they prefer Skype sessions to face-to-face meetings? What is the best number to reach them? Are they among the 33% of American’s that have chucked their landlines in favor of cell phone service?

Keep in mind, communication frustration is a two way street. A client you’ve worked with for years could now be tossing out your newsletters, when he or she used to pour over them. It isn’t because they no longer value your insights, but rather they read their “news” online. You won’t know this until you ask about their preferences. Maybe it is during the intake process, or the annual review, or even a midsummer survey. The key is to get ahead of the issue before it becomes an issue.

Using your clients’ favored communication methods is as much of an offensive play as a defensive play. You become more efficient and eliminate some frustration in your day. You also ensure that you never unwittingly earn the label, “that annoying caller/texter/e-mailer/snail-mailer/Skyper/or Facebook messenger.”

http://www.smartplanet.com/blog/business-brains/one-third-of-us-households-chuck-landlines-now-use-mobile-only/20746

Second Opinions on Investment Performance By Sue Bergin

There was a day when you could sense when someone was looking over your shoulder. Technology, however, has made those days a thing of the past.

With the increasing number and sophistication of personal financial management software sites and mobile applications, it is getting easier for your clients to get second opinions on the investment advice you provide.

Technology-driven portfolio analysis boasts the ability to provide independent and objective investment evaluation, which is appealing to investors on a few levels. From a client’s perspective, they can get a second opinion on your recommendations at no charge, with no obligation, and relatively little effort. Once data is entered, they have a convenient place to go for aggregated and up-to-date information and continual guidance.

The functionality and sophistication of these personal financial management sites and mobile applications is evolving at warp speed. Take SigFig for an example. SigFig aggregates all investment holdings then makes recommendations based on current holdings. It compares the holdings in a user’s portfolio against other investments in the same category and share class. It then provides suggestions of other, less expensive investments that perform better than the user’s current holdings. It even goes a step further. After reviewing the user’s trading patterns, it evaluates the brokerage fees paid. Even individual advisors are evaluated based on the fees assessed and performance obtained. This functionality has led to all kinds of provocative “Find out if your financial advisor is overcharging you” headlines!

Another media darling is Jemstep, which scored a “Use Jemstep to See if Your Broker is Wasting Your Money” headline. Jemstep’s ranking engine analyzes 80 attributes of more than 20,000 mutual funds and ETFs.
Jemstep helps clients identify their financial goals, provides a ranked list of the “best investment options” for that client, and tracks aggregated investment performance.

These services and dozens of others are gaining in popularity. They are free or come at a modest fee, and they have seized the attention of both venture capitalists and the media. Your tech savvy clients are likely to be aware of them, and very well may be relying on them for a second opinion of your performance.

There is a Name for it_#34timesaday

Your mobile device isn’t in its usual spot … your back pocket.  It’s not on the charger.  It’s not in your back pocket.  It’s not on the charger.  You check your pocket again.  Then you head to the car.  Then, back to the charger.

Sound familiar?

If you have trouble functioning without your mobile device, you are not alone.  In fact, you might be suffering from Nomophobia.

Nomophobia describes the anxiety many feel when they are without the use of their mobile phone.  The phrase was coined after the findings of a 2008 British study.  The researchers found that 53% of survey participants suffered anxiety that was on par with wedding day jitters and dental examinations, when they are without usage of their phones.

Fifty-five percent of those surveyed said the need for constant connectivity was driven mainly by a desire to keep in touch with friends and family.  Ten percent said that work demands required them to stay reachable at all times.  More than half of the nomophobes never turned off their phones.

This phenomenon has spread at an even pace with mobile adoption rates. SecurEnvoy’s more recent study found that the number of nomophobes has risen to 66%.

Interestingly, more women worry about loss of mobile connectivity than men – 70% of the women surveyed compared to 61% of the men.  However, the men were more likely to have more than one mobile device to maintain connectivity.

Not surprising, 18-24 year olds were the most nomophobia-prone.  This is not, however, an epidemic of the young.  People over the age of 55 were the third most nomophobic lot.

It’s debatable whether anxiety caused by mobile disruption rises to a phobic level.  Irrefutable is the extent with which mobile devices have changed our world and our experiences.

The 2008 study was sponsored by a UK Post Office who commissioned YouGov, a UK-based research organisation to look at anxieties suffered by mobile phone users.

Thisislondon.co.uk. April 1, 2008