Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: October 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Developed market equities have had an impressive run so far in 2013, while fixed income, emerging markets and commodities have lagged. After telegraphing a tapering of asset purchases, the Fed surprised investors on September 18 with a decision to keep the quantitative easing program in place, wanting to see greater clarity on economic growth and a waning of fiscal policy uncertainty before reducing the level of asset purchases.

Asset prices moved immediately higher in response to the Fed’s decision; however that served to be the high-water mark for equities for the quarter.  Then concern over U.S. fiscal policy surfaced and has weighed on markets over the last few weeks. Unlike in previous years, deals to raise the debt ceiling and fund the government will result in limited fiscal drag; however, the headlines will serve to increase market volatility over the short term.

U.S. equity markets posted solid gains in the third quarter, led by small caps and growth-oriented companies.  High-yielding equities continue to lag. Developed international equity markets meaningfully outpaced U.S. markets in the quarter, with most countries generating double-digit returns.  As a result, the gap of outperformance for U.S. markets has narrowed for the year.  Emerging economies have been negatively impacted by the discussion of the Fed reducing liquidity, slower economic growth and weaker currencies.  While emerging markets equities rebounded in the third quarter, as a group they are still negative for the year with Brazil and India especially weak.

Interest rates continued their rise to start the quarter, with the 10-year Treasury note briefly hitting 3% in the beginning of September.  Rates then began to move lower, helped by an avoidance of conflict in Syria and the postponing of Fed tapering. All fixed income sectors were positive in the third quarter, led by high-yield credit.  Year to date through September, high yield has produced gains, while all other major fixed income sectors are negative. Outflows from taxable bond funds have slowed significantly in recent weeks, so the technical backdrop has improved somewhat.

We believe that interest rates have begun the process of normalization, and over the long term, the bias is for higher interest rates.  However, this process will be prolonged and likely characterized by fits and starts. The Fed will soon face the decision to taper asset purchases again later this year, with the earliest action in December.  Despite their decision to reduce or end asset purchases, the Fed has signaled short-term rates will be on hold for some time. Rising longer-term interest rates in the context of stronger economic growth and low inflation is a satisfactory outcome. Our fixed income allocation is well positioned with less interest-rate risk and a yield premium versus the broad market.

However, we continue to view a continued rapid rise in interest rates as one of the biggest threats to the U.S. economic recovery.  The recovery in the housing market, in both activity and prices, has been a positive contributor to growth this year.  Stable, and potentially rising, home prices help to boost consumer confidence and net worth, which impacts consumer spending in other areas of the economy.  Should mortgage rates move high enough to stall the housing market recovery, it would be a negative for economic growth.

We continue to approach our broad macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move into the final months of the year, and a number of factors should continue to support the economy and markets.

  • Monetary policy remains accommodative: The Fed remains accommodative (even with the eventual end of asset purchases, short-term interest rates will remain low for the foreseeable future), the ECB stands ready to provide additional support if necessary, and the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation.
  • Global growth strengthening: U.S. economic growth has been sluggish, but steady.  The manufacturing and service PMIs remain solidly in expansion territory. Outside of the U.S. growth has not been very robust, but it is positive. China appears to have avoided a hard landing.
  • Labor market progress: The recovery in the labor market has been slow, but stable. Initial jobless claims, a leading indicator, have declined to a new cycle low.
  • Housing market improvement: The improvement in home prices, typically a consumer’s largest asset, boosts net worth, and as a result, consumer confidence.  However, another move higher in mortgage rates could jeopardize the recovery.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested or returned to shareholders. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Fiscal policy uncertainty: After Congress failed to agree on a continuing resolution to fund the government, we entered shutdown mode on October 1.  While the economic impact of a government shutdown is more limited, the failure to raise the debt ceiling (which will be reached on October 17) would have a more lasting impact. A default remains unlikely in our opinion, and there will be little fiscal drag as a result of a deal, but the debate does little to inspire confidence. The Fed continues to provide liquidity to offset the impact.
  • Fed mismanages exit: The Fed will soon have to face the decision of whether to scale back asset purchases, which could prompt further volatility in asset prices and interest rates. If the economy has not yet reached escape velocity when the Fed begins to scale back its asset purchases, risk assets could react negatively as they have in the past when monetary stimulus has been withdrawn.  The Fed will also be under new leadership next year, which could add to the uncertainty.  However, if the Fed does begin to slow asset purchases, it will be in the context of an improving economy.
  • Significantly higher interest rates: Rates moving significantly higher from here could stifle the economic recovery.
  • Europe: While the economic situation appears to be improving in Europe, the risk of policy error still exists.  The region has still not addressed its structural debt and growth problems; however, it seems leaders have realized that austerity alone will not solve its issues.

Risk assets should continue to perform if real growth continues to recover despite the higher interest rate environment; however, we expect heightened volatility in the near term. Valuations in the U.S. equity market remain reasonable while valuations abroad look more attractive. We continue to emphasize high-conviction opportunities within asset classes, as well as strategies that can exploit market inefficiencies.

Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Global Equity: Large-cap growth, dividend growers, Japan, frontier markets, international microcap
  • Fixed Income: MBS, global credit, short duration
  • Absolute Return: closed-end funds, relative value, long/short credit
  • Private Equity: company-specific opportunities

Asset Class Returns10.9.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook

The views expressed above are those of Brinker Capital and are not intended as investment advice.

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: September 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

The U.S. equity markets experienced a modest pullback in August, with a -2.9% decline in the S&P 500 Index, fueled by concern over the anticipated Fed tapering of asset purchases as well as a U.S.-led military strike on Syria. However, the index is still up +16.2% through August, the best start since 2003.

International equity markets fared better than U.S. markets in August despite the headwind of a stronger U.S. dollar.  So far this year, the return of developed international equities has been about half of the S&P 500 return while emerging market equities have declined -8.8%.  Both Brazil and India have experienced declines of more than -20.0%, suffering from significantly weaker currencies and slowing growth.

Fixed income outperformed equities in August on a relative basis, but the Barclays Aggregate Index still fell -0.5%.  Interest rates continued their move higher, and the yield curve steepened further. The yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note has increased 140 basis points from a low of 1.6% in early May, to 3% on September 5, fueled by the Fed’s talk of tapering asset purchases.  The technicals in the fixed income market have deteriorated markedly.  The rise in rates has not yet lost momentum, and investor sentiment has turned, causing large redemptions in fixed income strategies. Our portfolios remain positioned in defense of rising interest rates, with a shorter duration, emphasis on spread product and a healthy allocation to low volatility absolute return strategies.

Interest rates are normalizing from artificially low levels, but still remain low on a historical basis.  Despite slowing or ending asset purchases, the Fed has signaled short-term rates will be on hold for some time. Rising longer-term interest rates in the context of stronger economic growth and low inflation is a satisfactory outcome. In addition, the fundamentals in certain areas of fixed income strategies, including non-Agency MBS, high-yield credit and emerging-market credit, look attractive.

However, we continue to view a continued rapid rise in interest rates as one of the biggest threats to the U.S. economic recovery.  The recovery in the housing market, in both activity and prices, has been a positive contributor to growth this year.  Stable, and potentially rising, home prices help to boost consumer confidence and net worth, which impacts consumer spending in other areas of the economy.  Should mortgage rates to move high enough to stall the housing market recovery, it would be a negative for economic growth.

Outside of the housing market, the U.S. economy continues to grow at a modest pace.  Initial jobless claims, a leading indicator, have continued to decline.  Both the manufacturing and service PMIs have moved further into expansion territory. U.S. companies remain in solid shape and valuations do not appear stretched. M&A activity has picked up. Global economic growth is also showing signs of improvement, in Europe, Japan and even China.

However, risks do remain.  In addition to the major risk of interest rates that move too high too fast, the markets are anticipating the end of the Fed’s quantitative easing program.  Should the Fed follow through in reducing monetary policy accommodation, it will do so in the context of an improving economy.  Washington will again provide volatility generating headlines as we approach deadlines for the budget and debt ceiling negotiations.  However, unlike in previous years, there is no significant fiscal drag to be addressed.  In addition, the nomination of a new Fed Chairman and geopolitical risks (Syria) are of concern.  The market may have already priced in some of these risks.

Risk assets should do well if real growth continues to recover despite the higher interest rate environment; however, we expect continued volatility in the near term. As a result, in our strategic portfolios we remain slightly overweight to risk.  We continue to seek high conviction opportunities and strategies within asset classes.

Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Domestic Equity: favor U.S. over international, financial healing (housing, autos), dividend growers
  • International Equity: frontier markets, Japan, micro-cap
  • Fixed Income: non-Agency mortgage backed securities, short duration, emerging market corporates, global high yield and distressed
  • Real Assets: REIT Preferreds
  • Absolute Return: relative value, long/short credit, closed-end funds
  • Private Equity: company specific opportunities

 Asset Class Returns9.6.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook: August 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

The U.S. equity markets hit new all-time highs in July after investors digested the Fed’s plans to taper asset purchases.  The S&P 500 Index gained over 5% during the month while the small cap Russell 2000 Index gained 7%. So far 2013 has been a stellar year for U.S. equities with gains of 20%. Second quarter earnings have been decent with 69% of S&P 500 companies beating estimates (as of 8/5)[1]; however, revenue growth remains weak at just +1.3% year over year. We will need to see stronger top-line growth for margins to be sustainable at current high levels.

8.8.13_Magnotta_AugustOutlook_1Developed international equity markets also participated in July’s rally, helped by a weaker U.S. dollar. The MSCI EAFE Index gained just over 4% for the month in local terms and gained over 5% in USD terms. Japan’s easing policies have been celebrated by investors, driving Japanese equity markets 17% higher so far in 2013. Emerging markets were able to eke out a gain of just 1% in July as Brazil and India continued to struggle in the face of slowing growth and weaker currencies.

While interest rate volatility overwhelmed the second quarter, the fixed income markets stabilized in July. After moving sharply higher in May and June, the 10-year U.S. Treasury rose only nine basis points during the month and at 2.64% (as of 8/5), remains at levels we experienced as recently as 2011. The Barclays Aggregate Index was relatively flat for the month. Small losses in Treasuries and agency mortgage-backed securities were offset by gains in credit. The high yield sector had a nice rebound in July as credit spreads tightened, gaining 1.9%.

8.8.13_Magnotta_AugustOutlook_2With growth still sluggish and inflation low, we expect interest rates to remain relatively range-bound over the near term; however, the low end of the range has shifted higher.  Volatility in the bond market should continue as the Fed begins to taper asset purchases.  Negative technical factors, like continued outflows from fixed income funds, could weigh on the asset class. Our portfolios remain positioned in defense of rising interest rates with a shorter duration, an emphasis on spread product, and a healthy allocation to low volatility absolute return strategies.

The pace of U.S. economic growth has continued to be modest, but attractive relative to growth in the rest of the developed world. U.S. GDP growth in the first half of the year has been below expectations; however, there are signs that growth has been picking up in the second quarter, including an increase in both the manufacturing and non-manufacturing purchasing manager’s indices (PMIs) and a decline in unemployment claims.  The improvement in the labor markets has been slow but steady.  Should the Fed follow through with their plans to reduce monetary policy accommodation, it will do so in the context of an improving economy, which should be a positive for equity markets.

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move into the second half of the year.  A number of factors should continue to support the economy and markets for the remainder of the year:

  • Monetary policy remains accommodative: The Fed remains accommodative (even with the eventual end of asset purchases, short-term interest rates will remain low for the foreseeable future), the ECB has pledged to support the euro, and now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation.
  • Fiscal policy uncertainty has waned: After resolutions on the fiscal cliff, debt ceiling and sequester, the uncertainty surrounding fiscal policy has faded.  The U.S. budget deficit has improved markedly, helped by stronger revenues.  Fiscal drag will be much less of an issue in 2014.
  • Labor market steadily improving: The recovery in the labor market has been slow, but steady.
  • Housing market improvement: The improvement in home prices, typically a consumer’s largest asset, boosts net worth and as a result, consumer confidence.  However, a significant move higher in mortgage rates could jeopardize the recovery.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested or returned to shareholders. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Fed mismanages exit: If the economy has not yet reached escape velocity when the Fed begins to scale back its asset purchases, risk assets could react negatively as they have in the past when monetary stimulus has been withdrawn.
  • Significantly higher interest rates: Rates moving significantly higher from here could stifle the economic recovery.
  • Europe: While the economic situation appears to be bottoming, the risk of policy error in Europe still exists.  The region has still not addressed its debt and growth problems; however, it seems leaders have realized that austerity alone will not solve its problems.
  • China: A hard landing in China would have a major impact on global growth.

We continue to seek high conviction opportunities and strategies within asset classes for our client portfolios.  Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Domestic Equity: favor U.S. over international, financial healing (housing, autos), dividend growers
  • International Equity: frontier markets, Japan, micro-cap
  • Fixed Income: non-Agency mortgage-backed securities, short duration, emerging market corporates, global high yield and distressed
  • Real Assets: REIT Preferreds
  • Absolute Return: relative value, long/short credit, closed-end funds
  • Private Equity: company specific opportunities
8.8.13_Magnotta_AugustOutlook_3

Detroit Files for Bankruptcy

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

On July 18, the City of Detroit filed for bankruptcy, becoming the largest American city to seek bankruptcy in court.  This course of action was anticipated by many market participants as Detroit’s fiscal situation has been deteriorating for some time. The city has accumulated more than $18 billion in debt, including $12 billion in unsecured obligations to lenders and retirees, over $6 billion in bonds secured by revenues, and has run operating deficits for a number of years. Detroit has suffered from a confluence of demographic and economic factors, including a significant loss of population and declining tax revenues, as described in the bankruptcy court declaration filed by Kevyn Orr, Detroit’s emergency financial manager (via Zero Hedge).

7.19.13_Magnotta_DetroitThis situation will be contentious as there are a number of parties involved, including bondholders, retirees, and other creditors that will seek recovery through the bankruptcy process.  Revenue bonds, which represent $6 billion of Detroit’s outstanding debt, have historically had high recovery values in bankruptcies.  The case will be watched very closely as the outcome could determine whether this type of restructuring becomes a model for other municipalities under significant fiscal pressure.

We do not view the actions of Detroit to signify broader credit weakness for U.S. municipalities.  Overall, municipal credit has been improving as revenues have rebounded.  The recent sell off in municipal bonds can be more attributed to the concern surrounding the Fed’s tapering of asset purchases and some technical pressures, not to underlying fundamentals.

At Brinker Capital, we favor active municipal bond strategies that draw on the resources of strong credit research teams and emphasize high quality issues and structures.  We have not felt it prudent to reach for yield in the current environment and will maintain our high quality bias.  With yields moving slightly higher, some value can be found in municipal bonds at the long end of the curve with yields at close to 5%.  Our municipal bond separate account strategies have no exposure to Detroit paper.  The mutual funds used within our discretionary products have very limited exposure to Detroit, the vast majority in bonds backed by revenues of the Detroit Water and Sewer Department.

Additional Links:

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook – July 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Risk assets were off to a decent start in the second quarter but then retreated after Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke’s testimony to Congress on May 22 laid the ground work for a reduction in monetary policy accommodation through tapering their asset purchases as early as September. While the U.S. equity markets were able to end the quarter with decent gains, developed international markets were relatively flat and emerging markets experienced sizeable declines. Weaker currencies helped to exacerbate these losses.

After starting to move higher in May, interest rates rose sharply in June and into early July, helped by the fears of Fed tapering. The yield 10-year U.S. Treasury has increased 100 basis points over the last two months to a level of 2.64% (through 7/10). The increase in rates was all in real terms as inflation expectations fell. Bonds experienced their worst first half of the year since 1994, in which we experienced four short-term rate hikes before June 30.

7.12.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_2While we have seen these levels of rates in the recent past (we spent much of the 2009-2011 period above these levels), the sharpness of the move may have been a surprise to some fixed income investors who then began to de-risk portfolios. In June, higher-risk sectors like investment-grade credit, high-yield credit and emerging market debt, as well as longer duration assets like TIPS, fared the worst. With growth still sluggish and inflation low, we expect interest rates to remain relatively range-bound over the near term; however, we do expect more volatility in the bond market. Negative technical factors like continued outflows from fixed income funds could weigh on the asset class. Our portfolios remain positioned in defense of rising interest rates, with a shorter duration, emphasis on spread product and a healthy allocation to low volatility absolute return strategies.

After weighing on the markets in June, investors have begun to digest the Fed’s plans to taper asset purchases at some point this year. Should the Fed follow through with their plans to reduce monetary policy accommodation, it will do so in the context of an improving economy, which should be a positive for equity markets.

7.12.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_3We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move into the second half of the year. A number of factors should continue to support the economy and markets for the remainder of the year:

  • Monetary policy remains accommodative: The Fed remains accommodative (even with the scale back on asset purchases short-term interest rates will remain low), the ECB has pledged to support the euro, and now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. This liquidity has helped to boost markets.
  • Fiscal policy uncertainty has waned: After resolutions on the fiscal cliff, debt ceiling and sequester, the uncertainty surrounding fiscal policy has faded. The U.S. budget deficit has improved markedly, helped by stronger revenues. Fiscal drag will be much less of an issue in 2014.
  • Labor market steadily improving: The recovery in the labor market has been slow, but steady. Monthly payroll gains over the last three months have averaged 196,000 and the unemployment rate has fallen to 7.6%. The most recent employment report also showed gains in average hourly earnings.
  • Housing market improvement: An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to net worth, and as a result, consumer confidence. However, a significant move higher in mortgage rates, which are now above 4.5%, could jeopardize the recovery.
  • U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested or returned to shareholders. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • 7.12.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_4Fed mismanages exit: If the economy has not yet reached escape velocity when the Fed begins to scale back its asset purchases, risk assets could react negatively as they have in the past when monetary stimulus has been withdrawn.
  • Significantly higher interest rates: Rates moving significantly higher from here could stifle the economic recovery.
  • Europe: The risk of policy error in Europe still exists. The region has still not addressed its debt and growth problems; however, it seems leaders have realized that austerity alone will not solve its problems.
  • China: A hard landing in China would have a major impact on global growth. A recent spike in the Chinese interbank lending market is cause for concern.

We continue to seek high conviction opportunities and strategies within asset classes for our client portfolios. Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Domestic Equity: favor U.S. over international, dividend growers, financial healing (housing, autos)
  • International Equity: frontier markets, Japan, micro-cap
  • Fixed Income: non-Agency mortgage backed securities, short duration, emerging market corporates, global high yield and distressed
  • Real Assets: REIT Preferreds
  • Absolute Return: relative value, long/short credit, closed-end funds
  • Private Equity: company specific opportunities

Asset Class Returns
7.12.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_1

The Name is Bond, Muncipal Bond

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

As interest rates have moved higher over the last six weeks, municipal bonds have sold off along with other fixed income sectors, but to a slightly greater degree. From May 1 through June 17, the Barclays Municipal Bond Index declined -2.25%, compared to -1.98% for the Barclays Aggregate Index and -1.72% for the Barclays Treasury Index. While municipals are still in negative territory year to date, they are slightly ahead of taxable bonds.

6.19.13_Magnotta_InterestRatesBoth the technicals and the fundamentals in the municipal bond market remain on solid footing. From a technical perspective, supply and demand dynamics are favorable. New issuance isn’t keeping up with maturing debt, resulting in a reduction in total outstanding supply. With 10-year municipal bonds now yielding 2.4% and 30-year maturities yielding above 4%, we will likely see buyers step back into the market. The muni/Treasury ratio is north of 100%. In addition, June and July are typically large months for reinvestments, potentially creating more demand for municipals.

On the fundamental side, state and local government finances have improved. State revenues are back to pre-2008 levels across the board and are expected to increase. Local governments, which source their revenues primarily from property tax receipts, have received a boost from stabilizing home prices. Most states have taken steps to address their longer-term entitlement program and pension issues in some form. While credit is improving generally, there are still areas of concern. Headlines surrounding Detroit, MI, Stockton, CA and Puerto Rico could negatively impact the municipal bond market, but we do not see a concern regarding widespread municipal defaults.

The backup in interest rates has resulted in significant outflows from both taxable and municipal bond mutual funds over the last two weeks. ICI reports that municipal bond funds experienced $2.2 billion in outflows the week ending June 5 and $3.2 billion in outflows the week ending June 12. The recent sell-off could provide an opportunity for municipal bond investors, especially those focused on higher quality intermediate and longer-term bonds where valuations are attractive.

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook – June 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Senior Investment Manager, Brinker Capital

Financial market performance diverged in May. Despite selling off in the second half of the month as investors began to worry about the Federal Reserve tapering its asset purchases, U.S. equity markets delivered solid returns, with the S&P 500 gaining +2.1%. In the equity markets, high dividend oriented sectors (utilities, telecom, staples) delivered negative returns, as did interest rate sensitive sectors like REITs and MLPs. International equity markets declined in May and were negatively impacted by a stronger U.S. dollar. Emerging markets continue to lag developed international markets.

Interest rates moved higher in May, attempting to return to more normal levels. In the U.S., both the 10-year Treasury note and 30-year bond climbed over 40 basis points resulting in negative returns for all major income sectors. Year to date, U.S. fixed income markets (Barclays Aggregate Index) have declined -0.9% while U.S. equity markets (S&P 500) have gained over 14%.

06.07.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_1The fear of the Fed tapering its stimulus as early as September has continued to weigh on investors as we move into June. While equity market indexes are just 3% off the recent highs, we’re experiencing more volatility. The last two occasions when the Fed has attempted to pare stimulus, the equity markets experienced double-digit declines. However, if the Fed does follow through with reducing the amount of asset purchases, it will do so in the context of an improving economy. More recent economic data has been mediocre, the recovery in employment will continue to be slow, and inflation is falling and now well below the Fed’s target. Market participants will be focusing on every data point in an effort to predict the Fed’s actions.

Interest rates have come down slightly from recent highs, but the 10-year note remains above 2%. We expect to see more bond market volatility as interest rates attempt to return to more normal levels. However, with growth still sluggish and inflation low, we expect interest rates to remain range-bound over the intermediate term.

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move through the second quarter. A number of factors should continue to support the economy and markets for the remainder of the year:

  • 06.07.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_2Global Monetary Policy Accommodation: The Fed remains accommodative (even if they scale back on asset purchases), the ECB has pledged to support the euro, and now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. This liquidity has helped to boost markets.
  • Housing Market Improvement: An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to net worth and, as a result, consumer confidence. However, a significant move higher in mortgage rates, which are now above 4%, could jeopardize the recovery.
  • U.S. Companies Remain in Solid Shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested or returned to shareholders. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.
  • Equity Fund Flows Turn Positive: Equity mutual fund flows turned positive in 2013, and while muted compared to flows into fixed income funds, remain a tailwind after several years of outflows. Investors experiencing losses on their fixed income portfolios could also be a driver of flows to equity funds.

However, risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • Europe: The risk of policy error in Europe still exists. While the ECB is willing to act as a lender of last resort, the region has still not addressed its debt and growth problems.
  • Sluggish Global Growth: Europe is in recession while Japan is using unconventional measures to create growth. China is showing signs of slowing further, as is Brazil.
  • U.S. Fiscal Drag: While we achieved some certainty on fiscal issues earlier this year, drag from higher taxes and the sequester will weigh on personal incomes and growth this year.

06.07.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook_4Because of massive government intervention in the global financial markets, we will continue to be susceptible to event risk. Instead of taking a strong position on the direction of the markets, we continue to seek high conviction opportunities and strategies within asset classes. Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Domestic Equity: dividend growers, housing related plays
  • International Equity: Japan, small & micro-cap emerging markets, frontier markets
  • Fixed Income: non-Agency mortgage backed securities, emerging market corporates, global high yield, short duration strategies
  • Real Assets: REIT Preferreds
  • Absolute Return: relative value, long/short credit
  • Private Equity: company specific opportunities

06.07.13_Magnotta_MarketOutlook

Monthly Market and Economic Outlook – May 2013

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

Risk assets continued their run in April, despite a small 3% pull-back mid-month. The easy monetary policies pursued by central banks in developed economies have forced investors out of cash and into higher yielding fixed income and equity strategies.  On May 3 the S&P 500 pushed above 1600 to an all-time high.  International equity markets outperformed U.S. equity markets in April, helped by continued strong performance from the Japanese equity markets, but U.S. markets continue to lead year to date. Even with stronger equity markets, the fixed income markets also rallied in April as interest rates moved lower and credit spreads tightened further.

After a near 20% move in the U.S. equity markets since November of last year, we may be susceptible to a pull-back in the near term; however, our longer-term view remains constructive. The market remains in a stronger fundamental position that at the 2007 high.

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. We believe the scale remains tipped in favor of tailwinds as we move through the second quarter. A number of factors should continue to support the economy and markets for the remainder of the year:

  • 5.6.13_Magnotta_MonthlyNewsletter_3Global Monetary Policy Accommodation: The Fed continues with their quantitative easing program, the ECB has pledged to support the euro, and now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. The markets remain awash in liquidity.
  • Housing Market Improvement: Home prices are increasing, helped by tight supply. Sales activity is picking up, and affordability remains at high levels. An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to consumer confidence.
  • U.S. Companies Remain in Solid Shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be reinvested or returned to shareholders. Borrowing costs remain very low. Corporate profits remain at high levels and margins have been resilient.
  • Equity Fund Flows Turn Positive: After experiencing years of significant outflows, investors have begun to reallocate to equity mutual funds. Positive flows could provide a tailwind to the global equity markets.

However, major risks facing the economy and markets remain, including:

  • 5.6.13_Magnotta_MonthlyNewsletter_2Europe: The ECB programs have bought time, but cannot solve the underlying problems in Europe. Austerity measures are serving only to weaken growth further and cause higher unemployment and social unrest. After how it dealt with Cyprus, there is risk of policy error in Europe once again.
  • U.S. Fiscal Policy: The automatic spending cuts will start to negatively impact growth in the second quarter, shaving an estimated 0.5% from GDP. In addition, the debt ceiling will need to be addressed again later this year.

Because of massive government intervention in the global financial markets, we will continue to be susceptible to event risk. Instead of taking a strong position on the direction of the markets, we continue to seek high conviction opportunities and strategies within asset classes. Some areas of opportunity currently include:

  • Domestic Equity: dividend growers, housing-related plays
  • International Equity: Japan, small and micro-cap emerging markets, frontier markets
  • Fixed Income: non-Agency mortgage backed securities, corporate credit, short duration strategies
  • Real Assets: REIT Preferreds, Master Limited Partnerships
  • Absolute Return: relative value, long/short credit
  • Private Equity: company specific opportunities
Annualized for periods greater than one year. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Source: FactSet, Red Rocks Capital.

Annualized for periods greater than one year. Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Source: FactSet, Red Rocks Capital.

 

 

 

The views expressed by Brinker Capital are for informational purposes only. Brinker Capital, Inc. a Registered Investment Advisor.

Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds

Magnotta @AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

We continue to approach our macro view as a balance between headwinds and tailwinds. The scale tipped slightly in favor of tailwinds to start the year as we saw a slight pickup in the U.S. economy, some resolution on fiscal policy, and even more accommodative monetary policy globally. However, we continue to face global macro risks, especially in Europe, which could result in bouts of market volatility. The strong market move in the first quarter, combined with higher levels of sentiment, and a potentially disappointing earnings season, may leave us susceptible to a pull-back in the near term, but our longer-term view remains constructive. While the second quarter may bring weaker growth in the U.S., consensus is for economic activity to pick up in the second half of the year.

Tailwinds
Accommodative monetary policy: The Fed continues with their Quantitative Easing Program and will keep short-term rates on hold until they see a sustained pickup in employment. The European Central Bank has also pledged support to defend the Euro and has committed to sovereign bond purchases of countries who apply for aid. Now the Bank of Japan is embracing an aggressive monetary easing program in an attempt to boost growth and inflation. The markets remain awash in liquidity.

U.S. companies remain in solid shape: U.S. companies have solid balance sheets that are flush with cash that could be put to work through M&A, capital expenditures or hiring, or returned to shareholders in the form of  dividends or share buybacks. While estimates are coming down, profits are still at high levels.

Housing market improvement: The housing market is showing signs of improvement. Home prices are  increasing, helped by tight supply. The S&P/Case-Shiller 20-City Home Price Index gained +8.1% for the 12-month period ending January 2013. Sales activity is picking up and affordability remains at high levels. An improvement in housing, typically a consumer’s largest asset, is a boost to confidence.

Equity Fund Flows Turn Positive:  After experiencing years of significant outflows, investors have begun to reallocate to equity mutual funds. Investors have added over $67 billion to equity funds so far in 2013 (ICI, as of  3/27/13), compared to outflows of $153 billion in 2012. Investors continue to add money to fixed income funds as
well ($70 billion so far this year).
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Headwinds

European sovereign debt crisis and recession: The promise of bond purchases by the ECB has driven down borrowing costs for problem countries and bought policymakers time, but it cannot solve the underlying  problems in Europe. Austerity measures are serving only to weaken growth further and cause higher unemployment and social unrest. After how it dealt with Cyprus, there is again risk of policy error in Europe.  We are also closely watching the Italian elections in June after February’s elections were inconclusive.

U.S. policy uncertainty continues: After passing the fiscal cliff compromise to start the year, Washington passed a short-term extension of the debt ceiling and more recently agreed on a continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown. The sequester, which was temporarily delayed as part of the fiscal cliff deal, went into effect on March 1. The automatic spending cuts have not yet been felt by most, but it will soon start to show  up in the second quarter and will shave an estimated 0.5% from GDP. In addition, the debt ceiling will need to be addressed again this summer.

Geopolitical Risks:
Recent events in North Korea are cause for concern.

This commentary is intended to provide opinions and analysis of the market and economy, but is not intended to provide personalized  investment advice. Statements referring to future actions or events, such as the future financial performance of certain asset classes, market segments, economic trends, or the market as a whole are based on the current expectations and projections about future events provided by various sources, including Brinker Capital’s Investment Management Group. These statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual events may differ materially from those discussed. Diversification does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss in a declining market, including possible loss of principal. This commentary includes information obtained from third-party sources. Brinker Capital believes those sources to be accurate and reliable; however, we are not responsible for errors by third-party sources on which we reasonably rely.

Housing Market a Reason for Optimism

Magnotta@AmyMagnotta, CFA, Brinker Capital

After detracting from economic growth for a number of years, the U.S. housing market is in a position to be a positive contributor to growth.  The supply and demand dynamics in the housing market are attractive.

Supply is at low levels.  According to the National Association of Realtors, the supply of available homes is currently 4.2 months, down from over 12 months at the worst of the market.  New housing starts have improved, but are still at levels last seen in the early 1990s.  There are also fewer foreclosed properties on the market. CoreLogic reported that 1.2 million properties were in some stage of foreclosure in January, a 21% year-over-year decrease.  Finally, investors (both individual and institutional) have been snapping up properties in previously distressed markets.

Source: FactSet, National Association of Realtors

Source: FactSet, National Association of Realtors

Some owners are waiting for higher prices to put their homes on the market.  However, prices are firming by a number of measures.  The S&P/Case-Shiller National Home Price Index gained +7.3% in 2012.  CoreLogic’s Home Price Index gained +9.7% year over year in January, the eleventh consecutive monthly increase.
Tighter levels of inventory have likely led to higher prices in recent months.  However, rising prices will eventually encourage homeowners to sell and builders to build, adding to inventory and thereby slowing the rise in prices.

Source: FactSet, U.S. Census Bureau

Source: FactSet, U.S. Census Bureau

The demand side of the equation is also positive.  There is pent-up demand for new housing that has built up over the last few years as households have been formed.  Additional job growth will create more demand.  Affordability is still at very high levels with interest rates at record low levels.  If interest rates start to move higher, it could be a trigger for fence sitters to move. Guidelines are strict for obtaining a loan (I can attest to this with my personal experience over the last month), but credit is being extended.

The constructive dynamics in the housing market should be a positive for the economy over the intermediate term.  There are additional benefits to the economy that stem from an improvement in housing – consumers spend on appliances, home improvement (I’ve visited Home Depot or Lowes every other day in the last few weeks), contractors, architects, etc.  In addition, stable and rising home prices will also serve as a boost to consumer net worth and confidence.