Dealing with Fear in Clients

Bev FlaxingtonBev Flaxington, The Collaborative

These are difficult economic times. Add the current economic climate to a market that hasn’t cooperated for some years, and you have investors with angst. Anyone with money saved, or looking at retirement, is feeling a bit worried and ill at ease. When investors are worried, it impacts the advisor. Sometimes a client will not make a decision out of fear. Sometimes referrals are impacted because clients hesitate to recommend friends and family until they see what happens with the markets. People often simply sit on the sidelines when they are fearful, because doing nothing always seems better than taking a risk.

Do advisors just have to wait out this period of angst? What if it doesn’t go away for some time? Are advisors doomed to live with fearful clients? Let’s look at some strategies for managing clients through fearful times, and perhaps even benefiting from the difficult conditions.

bev blog 12.13.12

(1)    Manage your own fears first. If you, as an advisor, are worried, this will impact your clients too. Remember, most of us recognize the “smell of fear.” We know when someone is scared or worried. If you aren’t managing your own reactions, it will be noticeable to your clients. Practice meditation or deep breathing. Go to the gym. Read books that make you laugh. Whatever you have to do to feel more upbeat and less worried, do it. And watch the way you speak. Your words should be balanced and realistic, but overall optimistic and connoting a sense of “in control” to your clients.

(2)    Stay proactive. Many of the fears come from the unknown. What will happen if our politicians can’t reach an agreement? What if they decide to do one thing over another? The news is filled with worst case scenarios. Stay on top of what’s being discussed, and provide education to your clients about what you will do in different scenarios. Show them you are paying attention and thinking about your responses based on different outcomes.

(3)    Provide education. This might be a great time to hold a client event or seminar on the things we do know about. Can you speak about long-term care? Can you talk about living well during the aging process? Can you examine 529’s and the college savings options? Find things that are more known and that may be impacting your clients now or in the future, and educate about them. Keep the focus on you and your expertise, while taking it off – even for a short time – the things that are distracting your clients.

(4)    Talk about the fear that clients and prospects have. Acknowledge that you are hearing about it from many people. Talk about how much having an advisor can put fears to rest. Instead of reading the paper every day and wondering what strategies they should take, your clients can depend on you to do this. It’s really the best time to have someone else looking out for them. Remind them of this whenever possible, and acknowledge the circumstances. You want to stay confident in your approach, but it can be helpful to let them know you understand their fears and concerns and that you are there to look out for them.

In many ways, times of uncertainty offer an opportunity for those who are confident and experienced in approach to be the beacon, or comfort, for worried investors. See what you can do to be that confident supporter during these interesting times.

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